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Thursday, January 21

  1. page Copyright, Intellectual Property and OERs edited ... Educase. (2007, March) 7 things you should know about..Creative Commons. Retrieved from: https…
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    Educase. (2007, March) 7 things you should know about..Creative Commons. Retrieved from: https://net.educause.edu/ir/library/pdf/ELI7023.pdf
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    Open Educational Resources
    One
    ResourcesOne time or
    Intellectual property right is “the legal rights which result from intellectual activity in the industrial, scientific, literary and artistic fields” which have been developed in a tangibleor visual form; and so ideas themselves, as long as they are not developed into something concrete, are not legally abiding. The need for such right was increased with the tremendous growth of the world-wide-web and the Internet, where one could easily find and access a vast range of intellectual property from all kinds of sources. (Prabhala, 2010) Such information could easily be used for learning and this is why since 2002 during a UNESCO Forum about “Using Information Technology to Increase Access to High-Quality Educational Content”, the Hewlett Foundation joined other movements who were interested in the open educational resources field to provide a better education for all. Its aim was to allow everyone to freely use good quality educative material which is presented online. This led to what is now known as the Open Educational Resources which refers to:
    “Teaching, learning, and research resources that reside in the public domain or have been released under an intellectual property license that permits their free use and re-purposing by others.” (Open Educational Resources)
    ...
    Prabhala, A. (2010). Copyright and Open Educational Resources. Canada: CommonWealth of Learning.
    What is Copyright? (n.d.). Retrieved from BBC: http://www.bbc.co.uk/copyrightaware/what-is
    Copyright
    What is Copyright? Simply put, it is a law that provides you with rights to any item which you may have created. There are two items which need to be taken into consideration when copyrighting a creation; these are the originality and the tangibility of the work. Originality is defined as being a new piece which you have created without any influence from other already copyrighted works while tangibility means that you have been able to develop and physically create your idea as you cannot copyright an idea which is still in your head. When you copyright an item, being a photo, book or video you are the sole person who can manage the rights you have over this piece of work.
    These include the right to:
    Distribute your work
    Publicly display your work
    Reproduce your work in any other form
    Derive any other works from your original item
    For a person to use any copyrighted work, he or she must obtain the permission from the creator. This person would be violating the rights of the creator if they were to use this work without permission and this is something which is not legal. It is good to note that copyright protection on a new creation starts from the moment the item is created and not from when it is registered. Although registering an item is not necessary for protection, it is still recommend.
    For how long is an item copyrighted? The length of copyright depends on the type of creation and also varies by countries. Some countries such as the United States have also set a minimum which is 25 years however the most common lengths of copyright include the whole life of the creator plus another 50 or 70 years after their death.
    As there is a fee related to registering a new creation many individuals used to make use of what is known as “poor man’s copyright”. This was a simple way of proving that your creation was in existence on a certain date. The creator simply posted a copy of the work to themselves so that they can have proof of the ownership and creation of their work.
    Most countries around the world also respect the any copyrighted work from other countries. However there may be instances where the rules vary. As such it is important to see the directions set out by each nation as to how copyright is handled.
    References
    Bbccouk. (2016). Bbccouk. Retrieved 21 January, 2016, from http://www.bbc.co.uk/copyrightaware/what-is
    Smartcopyingeduau. (2016). Smartcopyingeduau. Retrieved 21 January, 2016, from http://www.smartcopying.edu.au/copyright-guidelines/copyright---a-general-overview/1-1-what-is-copyright-
    Plagiarismtodaycom. (2016). Plagiarismtodaycom. Retrieved 21 January, 2016, from https://www.plagiarismtoday.com/stopping-internet-plagiarism/your-copyrights-online/1-what-is-a-copyright/
    Copyrightgov. (2016). Copyrightgov. Retrieved 21 January, 2016, from http://copyright.gov/help/faq/faq-general.html
    Templeton, B. (2016). Templetonscom. Retrieved 21 January, 2016, from http://www.templetons.com/brad/copymyths.html

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    5:29 am
  2. page Adaptive systems and responsive designs edited ... DreamBox learning. (2016) Adaptive Learning. Retrieved from: http://www.dreambox.com/adaptive-…
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    DreamBox learning. (2016) Adaptive Learning. Retrieved from: http://www.dreambox.com/adaptive-learning
    Mukherjee,S. (2013) Adaptive Learning Systems: A Tool to Personalize Learning. Retrieved from: http://www.tatainteractive.com/pdf/White-Paper_Adaptive_Learning_Systems.pdf
    A Social Personalized Adaptive E-Learning Environment: A Case Study in Topolor
    What is an Adaptive e-Learning environment? This is a system which provides content to the learners in an adaptive manner. This means that new content is only provided based on the following characteristics including the learner’s preferences, needs and knowledge. Social e-Learning (and adaptive) environments have emerged which provide the users with features similar to those found on social networking websites. These consist of sharing, rating and commenting etc.
    The aim of this research is to find out whether a system with a number or features typically found on social websites increase how useful and useable a system is. Research indicates that when students are introduced to a new system, a lot of time is used up when the students explore this new system. While this is not necessarily bad, the students would not need to waste this time if they are introduced to a system which they are already familiar with.
    Topolor is intended to be an environment which the students are already familiar with. It includes the following features: a home page where the user can see any posts which were created by other students, view any asked questions and post a new status. A “Module Center” will allow the users to access all modules which are available online and also provides various recommendations. A “Quiz Service” runs automatic quizzes which consist of a number of random questions and once this quiz is over feedback is sent immediately to the learner.
    An experiment which consisted of twenty-one students was set up were the students during a lesson on “Collaborative Filtering” were using Topolor while following a list of items which they needed to do. The tasks ranged from create a Learning Status to sending messages to answering peer questions. Ten participants then answered a questionnaire about Topolor. This consisted of two sets of eighteen questions each, a section about the ease of use and the other about the usefulness of the features found in the system.
    When the mean of the results was calculated, the final data points out that most of the students classified the features easy to use. The results also show that on the whole the students found all the features as being useful. A small amount of qualitative data was also collected and the students generally gave positive views noting that a good feature is its similarity to social networking sites.
    Some future updates are also planned. These include having more features such as favourite-ing other user’s statuses, an improved version of the messaging system where notifications are better presented to the user and the ability to share statuses.
    References:
    Shi, Lei, Cristea, Alexandra I., Foss, Jonathan G. K., Al Qudah, Dana and Qaffas, Alaa. (2013) A social personalized adaptive E-Learning environment: a case study in Topolor. IADIS International Journal on WWW/Internet. pp. 1-17. ISSN 1645-7641 (In Press)

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    Activity Theory, Adaptive System and Responsive Design
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    4:40 am
  3. page Copyright, Intellectual Property and OERs edited ... O’Neal,C. (2007, January 4) Creative Commons in K-12 Education: Using and Sharing Students' Wo…
    ...
    O’Neal,C. (2007, January 4) Creative Commons in K-12 Education: Using and Sharing Students' Work Safely. Retrieved from: http://www.edutopia.org/creative-commons-k-12-education
    Educase. (2007, March) 7 things you should know about..Creative Commons. Retrieved from: https://net.educause.edu/ir/library/pdf/ELI7023.pdf
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    Open Educational Resources
    One time or another everyone must have heard of the word “Copyright.” Copyright is when the law gives the subject full rights over his intellectual property use and supply. (What is Copyright?)
    Intellectual property right is “the legal rights which result from intellectual activity in the industrial, scientific, literary and artistic fields” which have been developed in a tangibleor visual form; and so ideas themselves, as long as they are not developed into something concrete, are not legally abiding. The need for such right was increased with the tremendous growth of the world-wide-web and the Internet, where one could easily find and access a vast range of intellectual property from all kinds of sources. (Prabhala, 2010) Such information could easily be used for learning and this is why since 2002 during a UNESCO Forum about “Using Information Technology to Increase Access to High-Quality Educational Content”, the Hewlett Foundation joined other movements who were interested in the open educational resources field to provide a better education for all. Its aim was to allow everyone to freely use good quality educative material which is presented online. This led to what is now known as the Open Educational Resources which refers to:
    “Teaching, learning, and research resources that reside in the public domain or have been released under an intellectual property license that permits their free use and re-purposing by others.” (Open Educational Resources)
    Open Educational Resources, including even quizzes, simulators and lesson planners, have different licensing rights from copyright. Most of them are openly licensed even thanks to the continuous efforts of the Creative Commons Institutions. Besides accessing information from OER, one can also create it by attaining information from ready existing OER, edit it, change it according the one’s needs and share the new resource (Prabhala, 2010).
    One might ask why such e-learning investment has become such a need. Besides, diminishing barriers, promoting equality of resources to everyone and promoting collaborations, there are several advantages of using OER’s. For the learner, this method allows more flexibility and more personalized form of learning as he/she can adapt to his/her own needs and can decide what resources to make use of and what others to put aside. The knowledge gained from online resources might be used by the learner to supply knowledge to others in a wider context. This approach centres on the students’ needs, and can help the learner to develop a vast range of skills. Before enrolling to a particular course, Some resources allow one to first test a particular course and then decide later to enrol, or not enrol, in it. Besides this gives one the possibility to do some comparisons with other resources.
    However, the stakeholders of OER’s are not just learners. The creators of such resources also gain from this system. This is because they will receive feedback on the material developed and it might also help them to build up their reputation. They will attain a higher degree of collaboration amongst the learners and are surely reaching more students. This approach also promotes digital literacy and equips the learners with a vast range of skills that gives them a better chance to work in multiple sectors (McGill, 2014). Furthermore, compared to other means of education it is relatively cheap, and it is introducing new methods of education and learning.
    Its pitfalls might be that the quality of the materials given might not be low. Some OER do not allow the feedback mechanism and some information might not be updated with current trends, hence providing the learner with inappropriate data. Their flexibility might also be limited to certain faculty needs as well (EDUCAUSE, 2010). Hylen also mention that some individuals might not be aware of the copyright or other licensing’s agreements that a resource might have, and might create replicas with modifications of resources by even breaking the copyright law, leading to unforeseen legal issues (Hylen).
    Because of its flexibility and advantages Open Educational Resources are surely becoming a fundamental part of the future of e-learning. It has sparked the educative level of interest and considering that we are surrounded by technology, ithas becomea truly valuable open approach to education the whole world is seeking. It is very practical and it is also helping from:
    “the practical perspectives of those whose task is to tackle the problems caused by the growing and migrating masses of culturally diverse humans” (Kozinska, Kursun, Wilson, McAndrew, & Scanlon, 2010).
    References:
    EDUCAUSE. (2010). 7 things you should know about Open Educational Resources. Retrieved from https://net.educause.edu/ir/library/pdf/ELI7061.pdf
    Hylen, J. (n.d.). Open Educational Resources: Opportunities and Challenges. Retrieved from http://www.oecd.org/edu/ceri/37351085.pdf
    Kozinska, K., Kursun, E., Wilson, T., McAndrew, P., & Scanlon, E. a. (2010). Are open educational resources the future of e-learning? In: 3rd International Future-Learning Conference: Innovations in. Istanbul. Retrieved from http://oro.open.ac.uk/21123/1/Kozinska_et_al.pdf
    McGill, L. (2014). Stakeholders and benefits. Retrieved from Open Educational Resources: https://openeducationalresources.pbworks.com/w/page/24838012/Stakeholders%20and%20benefits
    Open Educational Resources. (n.d.). Retrieved from The William and Flora Hewlett Foundation: http://www.hewlett.org/programs/education/open-educational-resources
    Prabhala, A. (2010). Copyright and Open Educational Resources. Canada: CommonWealth of Learning.
    What is Copyright? (n.d.). Retrieved from BBC: http://www.bbc.co.uk/copyrightaware/what-is

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    3:33 am
  4. page Adaptive systems and responsive designs edited ... An adaptive e-learning environment is mostly based on models, one of which is the student. In …
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    An adaptive e-learning environment is mostly based on models, one of which is the student. In the article “Student Modelling in Adaptive E-Learning Systems” one can identify how these models are incorporated within the process. Adaptive learning should be based not just on the students prior knowledge but also on his/her behaviour, hence the linkage of online structures should be based on the students profile including what his likes/dislikes are. It should be based on the principle that the learning characteristics of each individual is different and that hence different educational settings are needed. Content should be automatically adapted to satisfy the needs of such students’ models.
    “The aim of adaptive e-Learning is to provide appropriate information to the right student at the right time”
    ...
    & Bechter, 2011
    )
    2011)
    Such models, activity theory and adaptive e-learning systems were also discussed in Pena-Ayala, Sossa and Mendez article. The Activity theory framework knows its root to Aleksei Leontiev a Russian psychologist and Kaptelinin describes it as:
    “Purposeful, transformative, and developing interaction between actors (“subjects”) and the world (“objects”).”
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    3:26 am
  5. page Adaptive systems and responsive designs edited ... DreamBox learning. (2016) Adaptive Learning. Retrieved from: http://www.dreambox.com/adaptive-…
    ...
    DreamBox learning. (2016) Adaptive Learning. Retrieved from: http://www.dreambox.com/adaptive-learning
    Mukherjee,S. (2013) Adaptive Learning Systems: A Tool to Personalize Learning. Retrieved from: http://www.tatainteractive.com/pdf/White-Paper_Adaptive_Learning_Systems.pdf
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    Activity Theory, Adaptive System and Responsive Design
    Learning from online sources has become a very common thing. (What is eLearning?) Developments are continuously being made to create the ideal situation for the learner to learn according to his/her own individual needs. With this aim in mind, adaptive e-learning methodologies were also introduced.
    Paramythis and Loidl-Reisinger refer to it as the process of monitoring your students doing activities; interpret such activities on “domain-specific models”, define their requirements after doing deep interpretations and act upon them to produce a learning environment which better caters for the need of the student. Adaptions in an e-learning environment starting from adaptions in the system interface itselfshould be various. Furthermore, changes can also be made in the structure of the coursethus making it personalized for the learner. Adaptations can also be made in the methods presented to the students where they discover new content from various online resources. Finally, amendments in the learning process might also be required one of which being the communication between the teacher and the student (Paramythis & Loidl-Reisinger, 2004) .
    Adapting to the students’ needs should also be made in terms of technology and devices. Nowadays, students’ e-learning does not necessarily take place on a desktop computer. Considering the drastic reduction inthe prices of the latest technology tools, I believe that most students also have access to smart phones, tablets and other devices. Hence it is fundamental that the online material provided to them is responsive according to the device’s screen. This is because structures which are suitable for a desktop computer does not necessarily suit a smart phone. This is known as responsive design. (Evans, 2015)
    An adaptive e-learning environment is mostly based on models, one of which is the student. In the article “Student Modelling in Adaptive E-Learning Systems” one can identify how these models are incorporated within the process. Adaptive learning should be based not just on the students prior knowledge but also on his/her behaviour, hence the linkage of online structures should be based on the students profile including what his likes/dislikes are. It should be based on the principle that the learning characteristics of each individual is different and that hence different educational settings are needed. Content should be automatically adapted to satisfy the needs of such students’ models.
    “The aim of adaptive e-Learning is to provide appropriate information to the right student at the right time”
    (Esichaikul, Lamnoi, & Bechter, 2011
    )
    Such models, activity theory and adaptive e-learning systems were also discussed in Pena-Ayala, Sossa and Mendez article. The Activity theory framework knows its root to Aleksei Leontiev a Russian psychologist and Kaptelinin describes it as:
    “Purposeful, transformative, and developing interaction between actors (“subjects”) and the world (“objects”).”
    This theory has been considered ever since the 1990’s as a fundamental mark for Human-Computer-Interaction (Kaptelinin). It’s aim is that of comprehending the mental abilities of different individuals while learning and this is why in their article Pena-Ayala, Sossa and Mendez carried out a case study to identify how this theory could help in building adaptive e-learning systems with the final aim of enhancing the students’ apprenticeship through previous predictions of the learning result.
    The activity theory is based on several principles including: object-orientedness, hierarchical structure, mediation, internalization-externalization, anticipation and development. Furthermore, to attain different AT goals, 4 architectures have been developed being Activity as:
    Basic Unit
    Individual Level
    Collective Level
    Network Level
    The case study was a national one and from all the electronic applications, 200 subjects were chosen. From these 200 only the first 18 who managed to finish all pre-stimulus (including exercisesand questions) in time and correctly were encouraged to continue to the next phase. During this process information gathering about the students was being made so that different students’ profiles were eventually developed. These 18 students were then divided in two groups, 9 of which being in a controlled group and the others being in an experimental group. Throughout this process, students were continuously being tested and monitored and their domain knowledge was also discovered. What was concluded was that the lectures which implemented the most effective principle for apprenticeship and anticipation, attained a higher level of students learning when compared to the apprenticeship attained through lectures chosen randomly without incorporating any personalized options such as those provided by an AeLS.
    It was concluded that: “the students’ apprenticeship is successfully stimulated when the delivered lecture matches their profile” regardless of the subjects (students) having lower domain knowledge. This is because the results also concluded that given stimuli based on the anticipation principle, the experimental group, despite having lower domain knowledge when compared to the controlled group, whose lectures were chosen randomly, produced higher apprenticeship and learning. With the final conclusion being that activity theory is indeed very convenient for implementing a “student-centered” AeLS. (Pena-Ayala, Sossa, & Mendez, 2013)
    References
    Esichaikul, V., Lamnoi, S., & Bechter, B. (2011). Student Modelling in Adaptive E-Learning Systems. Knowledge Management & E-Learning: An International Journal, III(3), pp. 342-355. Retrieved from http://www.kmel-journal.org/ojs/index.php/online-publication/article/viewFile/124/102
    Evans, D. (2015, December 14). Adaptive and Responsive Design for eLearning: Part 1. Retrieved from efront: http://www.efrontlearning.net/blog/2015/12/adaptive-and-responsive-design-for-elearning-part-1.html
    Kaptelinin, V. (n.d.). Activity Theory. In M. Soegaard, & R. F. Dam, The Encyclopedia of Human-Computer Interaction (2nd ed.). Interaction Design Foundation. Retrieved from https://www.interaction-design.org/literature/book/the-encyclopedia-of-human-computer-interaction-2nd-ed/activity-theory
    Paramythis, A., & Loidl-Reisinger, S. (2004, February). Adaptive Learning Environments and e-Learning. II(1), pp. 181-194.
    Pena-Ayala, A., Sossa, H., & Mendez, I. (2013, September 7). Activity theory as a framework for building adaptive e-learning systems: A case to provide empirical evidence. Computers in Human Behavior, 131- 145.

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    3:25 am

Tuesday, January 12

  1. page Adaptive systems and responsive designs edited Adaptive systems based on thinking and learning styles. The idea of adaptive learning goes back t…
    Adaptive systems based on thinking and learning styles.
    The idea of adaptive learning goes back to the work of B.F. Skinner in the 1950’s. Adaptive learning adjusts the learning experience based on a student’s progress. Basically it shifts from the teacher-centric model to a student-centric model. Two important factors that an educator has to take into account in order to be able to adapt the educational content to each individual learner are their thinking and learning styles. Moreover, one has to also keep in mind the curriculum requirements. The thinking style refers to the unique way each person thinks and behaves. These thinking styles are the outcome of experiences and interaction we have had with the people around us. Moreover, the learning style refers to the method or strategy that every person has when learning.
    An experiment using an Adaptive e-learning hypermedia system based on thinking and learning styles (AEHS-TLS) was designed to explore the effect of adaptation to different thinking and learning styles. This experiment was conducted at the Annaba University in Algeria with 40 students for 4 different subjects (ORL, dermatology, ophthalmology and language). This system was organized into three components:
    The domain model is used for organizing the learning content.
    The learner model is the representation of information about an individual learner. The kind of adaptation which the system has to deliver depends on the nature of this information. The information about the learner consists of the goals and preferences, the thinking and learning style, and the knowledge and performance.
    The adaptation model specifies the way in which the presentation of the content is altered according to the knowledge and thinking style of the learner. The adaptation model is made up of three sub models which are the narrative paths sub model that supports a narrative graph, which contains a different path for each thinking style, the pedagogical rules sub model which consists of a set of rules and activities that controls the learning process and the control sub model which selects the most suitable path to deliver pages with learning content to students.
    The hypothesis of this adaptive system was proved that it can increase the level of learners. What is even more interesting about this system is that it does not only adapt the teaching material according to the thinking and learning styles, but it also takes into account the learner’s goals and preferences.
    For future work, an area in adaptive systems which requires improvements is the ability to create adaptive tests. By this, educators will have the opportunity to both adapt the content of delivery and the evaluation of the learner.
    References:
    Mahnane,L , Laskri, M.T and Trigano,P. (2013, May) A model of Adaptive e-learning Hypermedia System based on Thinking and Learning Styles. International Journal of Multimedia and Ubiquitous Engineering, 8(3), 339-350.
    DreamBox learning. (2016) Adaptive Learning. Retrieved from: http://www.dreambox.com/adaptive-learning
    Mukherjee,S. (2013) Adaptive Learning Systems: A Tool to Personalize Learning. Retrieved from: http://www.tatainteractive.com/pdf/White-Paper_Adaptive_Learning_Systems.pdf

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